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Education

Peter Schütt

Peter Schütt

Peter Schütt was born in 1939 in Basbeck on the Niederelbe. He studied German and history in Göttingen, Bonn, and Hamburg. After obtaining a university diploma, he submitted his dissertation about the Baroque author,Andreas Gryphius, and received his doctorate in philosophy.

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Dante's Dream at the Time of the Death of Beatrice 1871

Pre-Raphaelitism

The Pre-Raphaelite movement began with the establishment in 1848 of the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and other artists as a protest against the conventional methods of painting then in use. The Pre-Raphaelites wished to regain the spirit of simple devotion and adherence to nature which they found in Italian religious art before Raphael.

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Hanns Theodor Flemming

Hanns Theodor Flemming

Hanns Theodor Flemming was raised in a home where art was truly appreciated. His father Max Leon Flemmig, who grew up in the Rhineland area, was a patron of the arts and collector whose collection included works by Picasso, Marc Chagall, Macke and Kandinsky. Flemming’s sister Evelinde Manon became a well-known photographer.

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In education section of this blog, we will get familiar with art schools, art critics and also will study some artworks. Art education works as a link between different disciplines and their intersections. A series of articles in other parts of the blog deepen this part.

“The etymology of ‘‘education’’ leads back into two separate but not dissimilar L roots: educare, with connotations of ‘‘drawing out’’ or ‘‘bringing up’’; and educere, with connotations of ‘‘leading forth.’’ The two strands do not yield disparate senses; they often converge. But they do represent different perspectives. The idea of education as a drawing out goes back to the very beginnings of Western philosophy. Plato’s recurring images of the teacher as midwife offer powerful early models for the drawing out of things already there within the student’s mind. If what is ‘‘led forth’’ is construed as the student’s own inner resources, the second strand is not clearly separate from the first.

But educere has other associations – as a leading forth of the students themselves at the completion of a process of formation of skills or abilities. / This second idea of education is enacted in our contemporary context in the ritualized ceremonies of graduation that mark the completion of structured programs of learning and accreditation.

Jack Bush

Colour Field Painting

A type of abstract painting in which the whole picture consists of large expanses of more or less unmodulated colour, with no strong contrasts of tone or obvious focus of attention. Sometimes Colour Field Paintings use only one colour; others use several that are similar in tone and intensity.

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The healing power of visual art

The healing power of visual art

Jung’s notion of the purpose of imagery and symbolism in his understanding of the human psyche, and how this information was conveyed through art, the stories, both pictorial and prosaic is illustrated in The Book of Lambspring (Gillabel).

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But educere has other associations – as a leading forth of the students themselves at the completion of a process of formation of skills or abilities. / This second idea of education is enacted in our contemporary context in the ritualized ceremonies of graduation that mark the completion of structured programs of learning and accreditation.

Having completed a process of initiation, the student is ‘‘led forth’’ into a professional group. More broadly, education can signify the completion of a process of initiation into the privileges and responsibilities of adult life. Here the idea of completion takes on connotations of the preparation for human life in its wholeness. ‘‘A complete and generous education . . . fits a man to perform . . . all the offices . . . of peace and war’’ (Milton, 1644). ‘‘Education is the formation of the whole man – intellect . . . character, mind and soul’’ (H. E. Manning, 1875).” (Lloyd, Genevieve (2005). “Education“, in: Tony Bennett, Lawrence Grossberg and Meaghan Morris (eds.) New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society. Blackwell Publishing, 97-98.)

Arts and cultural education must be accessible to all. As a blog we are limited by the space. That is why, seeing the works, meeting the artists, and acquiring knowledge will all be done online through the articles and the shared links. Through the development of sensitivity, creativity and critical thinking, the blog contributes dynamically to our knowledge of understanding art. It requires training of various people involved, promoting mutual knowledge, acquisition and sharing of common references. We aim to provide scholarly dimensions in our art education section. The blog allows the readers to understand their experiences and to better understand the contemporary world. 

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