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Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo, The Broken Column

Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954) was a Mexican mainly autodidact artist who is known for her self-portraits. Mexican culture and the art of the pre-Columbian peoples of America had a great influence on her work. Frida Kahlo’s artistic style is sometimes referred to as rustic art or folk art. André Breton, the founder of surrealism, classified her as a surrealist.

She was in poor health all her life. She fell ill with polio at the age of six, the consequences of which accompanied her forever. In 1925, she suffered a serious car accident which left her in pain. In 1928 she married the famous Mexican artist Diego Rivera, and in addition to their common interests they were linked by the fact that they both supported the Communist Party.

As Chilvers and Glaves-Smith (2003: 974) aptly write, “Kahlo’ paintings of her own physical and psychic pain are narcissistic and nightmarish, but also – like her personality -fiery and flamboyant. She presents herself as a wounded deer in a painting of 1946 or with her spine as a broken column (1944, Museo Dolores Olmedo Patino, Mexico).” (For more info: s.v. Kahlo, Frida, in: Chilvers, Ian and Glaves-Smith, John (2003) A Dictionary of Modern and Contemporary Art. OUP.)

Frida (2002) is an American biographical film which depicts Frida’s professional and private life.

Photo: The Broken Column (Original title: La Columna Rota), 1944, Oil on Masonite, 39.8 cm × 30.6 cm (15.7 in × 12.0 in), Location: Museo Dolores Olmedo, Xochimilco, Mexico City, Mexico

For a quick review of „The Broken Colum“ watch the following film:

Play Video about Frida Kahlo, The Broken Column

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